Feeding Funnel & Drinking Vessel

Feeding Funnel & Drinking Vessel

This summary compares two status objects from the Polynesian islands: the feeding funnel (korere) from New Zealand, and the drinking vessel (saqa moli) from Fiji. In Polynesian cultures, great importance was put on protecting and preserving a social hierarchy of nobles and commoners who possessed varying degrees of mana. Social hierarchy and status needed to be Read more

Lizard Man Figure & Canoe Prow

Lizard Man Figure & Canoe Prow

Throughout Polynesia, art objects reveal a close relationship between the environment and everyday life. From everyday objects like the flywhisk to objects associated with royalty like Hawaiian feather capes, the vast majority of art pieces reflect the synergy and connection people have with the natural resources of their environment. Read more

Barkcloth & Fan

Barkcloth & Fan

This summary compares and contrasts two art objects from Polynesia: one is a Siapo (barkcloth) panel from Samoa; and the other is a Tahi’i (fan) from the Marquesas Islands. I chose these objects because I was interested in clothing and the relationship garments have with identity, status, and power relations. I chose these objects because they are two artifacts associated with Polynesian women. Read more

Figure & War Club

Figure & War Club

I chose to compare this ivory female figure from Tonga and a wooden war club from Samoa as representatives of femininity and masculinity within their respective cultures.Tongan and Samoan culture are closely intertwined, so much so that they mention each other in their respective ancient mythologies (Gunson 1990, 176). Read more

Three Pendants & Petroglyphs

Three Pendants & Petroglyphs

The Birdman Petroglyphs of Easter Island and the hei tiki of New Zealand represent artwork of the Polynesian Islands through formal properties such as materials, craftsmanship, and designs chosen. The petroglyphs and hei tiki highlight the Polynesian method of employing resources associated with the land, low relief carving, and acknowledging an unseen force: mana. Read more

Lei & Pendant

Lei & Pendant

These Polynesian art objects are fascinating for exemplifying the role of Polynesian bodily ornamentation generally, besides being visually appealing and skillfully crafted. I hope to be able to compare the way they have each functioned historically within the context of a social matrix. Read more

Beaked Battle Hammer & War Club

Beaked Battle Hammer & War Club

The Totokia and the U’u are both war clubs developed in different islands in Polynesia. The totokia was built on Fiji while the U’u was a product of the Marquesan Islands. Both clubs were seen as essential items for warriors and chiefs on these islands. Although these clubs differ in many ways, there are some similarities in the way each club was Read more

Beaked Battle Hammer & Pole Club

Beaked Battle Hammer & Pole Club

Competition for resources among the numerous chiefdoms in Polynesia made warfare commonplace. The populations of these societies, including those on Fiji and Cook Islands, were well known for making unique weaponry. I chose the Pole Club and Beaked Battle Hammer as objects to examine because they are prime examples of the time and effort that would have been put into weaponry. Read more

War Clubs

War Clubs

Warfare stems from a when a culture, society, or nation is unable to coexist together with others peacefully. Using the available resources and technology that are prevalent, weapons were able to be made efficiently. Many different types of weapons were constructed and each had a different structure that was associated with its purpose. War clubs, also known as U’U in the Marquesas Islands, were mainly constructed Read more

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